Military, Navy, nursing, Parents, self care

Meet Pam: Veteran, Nurse, Parent, Student, Scholar!

Pam Schreurs White Coat Ceremony
Pam at her White Coat Ceremony, four months after writing this blog post – Congratulations Pam!

Pamela Schreurs

Bachelor of Science, Nursing

https://portfolium.com/PamelaSchreurs

https://www.instagram.com/pamela_schreurs_nuscholar/

Greetings! My name is Pamela and I am a mother to two wonderful children, as well as a nursing student at National University.  I am also a US Navy veteran, and my husband is currently active duty.  It can be a struggle being a full-time mom and nursing student (especially if a spouse is deployed!), but I have felt very supported since starting my journey at NU.  In my downtime I enjoy spending time with my kids, volunteering with Girl Scouts San Diego, and taking time for myself.  One big take away from nursing school has been that self-care helps make you a more present nurse and parent.  I feel blessed to have had fabulous instructors who incorporate integrative therapy into the classroom, and I am excited to weave meditation, aromatherapy, and guided breathing into not only my nursing practice, but also my home life.

In July of 2018, I was accepted into the NU Scholars Program.  Through NU Scholars, I have been able to support peers’ community service projects, and am planning my own project hosting wellness workshops for elementary-aged girls.  I will also be hosting SafeZones LGBTQ literacy training for NU staff, faculty, and students to help promote a safe and welcoming environment for all who attend NU.

The NU Scholars Program has a strong emphasis on goal-setting, and I have learned a lot about how to set and structure concrete short- and long-term goals. My short-term educational goal for this year is to fully commit myself to the last two weeks of my psychosocial nursing rotation.  This is perhaps the most important rotation in terms of therapeutic communication and empathy, and I want to absorb everything I can before beginning my next rotation.  My long-term goal is to graduate with an excellent GPA in July – nursing school is tough, but I pride myself on putting in the work I need to maintain my GPA.  I cannot wait to have my kids help me put on my white coat in a few months, it is going to be one of the best feelings in the world!  After achieving this first long-term goal, my next long-term goal is to continue my education at a master’s level, focusing on pediatric mental health.

adult learner, Graduate Student, Military, Navy, Parents, Study Abroad

Studying Abroad as a Parent

Brent Harris headshot

Brent Harris

https://portfolium.com/baharris123

Creative Writing MFA

29 Palms Region

“Freeeedddooooommm!”

Shout that in your best Braveheart voice, for that’s the euphoria I felt as I stepped onto the curb, kissed the wife and kids goodbye, and sauntered into the Palm Springs departure terminal.

In January, my Navy wife went away on deployment – for seven months – leaving me at home with two kids, a Master’s program, community volunteer projects, and a perpetually empty cup of coffee. Those months were challenging. My daughter had ballet twice a week and a residency in Anaheim, my son had Toddler Tumbling and was not yet in school. I was teaching on Tuesdays, in between two back-to-back scripts for school.

A break loomed.

The NU Scholar’s program offered a study abroad opportunity to Tijuana. A weekend away from the kids, a break when there was none, to go down South of the Border? Sign me up! I dutifully did the repeat photography assignments, finding pictures of the past to compare with pictures from today. I was all set. And then my son got pink-eye.

I couldn’t go.

The joys of parenthood.

Flash forward several months, and I was afforded an opportunity to visit Vancouver to study abroad. And I’m so very glad I did. Vancouver is a beautiful place with beautiful people. It’s not an old city, but it is rich with culture and vibrant nature. Had I gone to the city by myself, as a tourist, I would have failed to see the splendor beyond the tourist traps. Going as part of the NU study abroad program, travelling with others, allowed me to see parts of the city most would have passed. An amazing coastline, foggy bridges, strange statues, a shower of autumn-red maple leaves, and buildings with a history all their own. The food was great, the people better, and at the end of each day, our phone cameras were full, and our feet were worn.

While there, my first feelings of Freedom! slipped away as the greatness of the experience enveloped me. It was no longer a trip to escape, but the forging of a new friendship. Vancouver will be with me forever.

Parents

Making Time for School

nicole alexander

By Nicole Alexander, NU Scholar (April 2018 Cohort)
Master of Science, School Psychology with PPSC School Psychology
https://portfolium.com/nicolealexande4

Most of us here at National are attempting the impossible, the school-work-family juggle. But I assure you, it’s possible. Find your motivation and really get to know yourself, and you can crush it. My motivation is my two daughters. I want to raise strong, fearless, hard-working women and the best way I can think of is to practice what I preach. Find what keeps you going, because when you’re writing a report at 1 am and you have to get up for work at five, you’re going to need it. Once you are good and fired up, get to know yourself. Here are some things I’ve discovered about myself: I can’t study at Starbucks because I get too distracted by people-watching, my brain stops functioning at 11 pm, I do my best work with a side of sushi, and studying in bed = naptime. Once motivation and self-awareness are ironed out, you can focus on figuring how to override the laws of the space-time continuum and manage to get it all done. If physics isn’t your thing, here are a few tips to salvage some time for coursework without abandoning your family and your sanity:

1. #to-do-to-done  

This may come as a bit of a shock, but not everyone uses a planner… I know, it’s crazy. I can barely brush my teeth without my planner. Not only does it keep me from forgetting important dates, it houses my bevy of to-do lists. Yes, lists. I make daily and weekly goals that fit perfectly into their corresponding days. I also find it helpful to make a separate work list, school list, and home list. OK, maybe I’m the crazy one, but it’s easier to accomplish a few things per day than stare at one formidable, mile-long list. Many prefer having it all in their phone—I’ve tried it, it’s not for me. I do however like the “Stickies” program on my laptop for my to-do lists, if you’re the techy-type.

2. #solvesmallproblems 

This trick is definitely my favorite. Maybe it’s just me, but I can’t accomplish any significant progress in my school work in those little intervals while on my lunchbreak, or waiting at the DMV, or while helping my kids with homework. I can, however, schedule that dentist appointment, or pay my phone bill, or drop that bag off at Salvation Army that’s been in my trunk for a month. Solving small problems throughout the day will clear your mind, your to-do list, your car, and your schedule for more meaningful chunks of study time later. Added bonus: the tiny rushes of adrenaline from accomplishing tasks will build momentum for that report that’s waiting for you to write it.

3. #sorrynotsorry 

Caution, this one can become addicting. Say no. Sounds simple? It’s not. This one is H-A-R-D but worth it and quite liberating. I enjoy painting, and baking, and creating. So, when someone appreciates my talents and asks me to help them paint their living room or bake my (amazing) cookies for a party, I struggle to say no. But there are only so many hours in a day, and it’s OK to put your priorities first. You have decided to accomplish the amazing feat of going to college, put some other stuff on the back burner, and go with the store-bought cookies.

4. #adultingishard 

Having fun is important in maintaining mental health. Definitely make time for guilt-free frivolity but be sure to get the work done first. How much fun can you really have with that deadline looming over you while you’re trying to bowl a perfect game?

5. #igetbywithalittlehelp 

If you are a college student with no job and no kids, congratulations, please go enjoy a nap on my behalf. If you’re like me, you have kids and they are adorable –but– physically, literally, metaphorically, emotionally and mentally preventing you from getting any work done. TGFG – Thank God For Grandma. Chances are, she’s super proud of you for going to college, and maybe willing to take the children away for an afternoon so you can accomplish something other than snack detail??

6. #childswap 

No grandma? Another awesome way to get some child-free time is the neighbor swap. I was lucky enough to have a neighbor with kids similar in age to mine, and we would swap kids. I would take all the kids for two hours, then she would take them for two hours. When you already have one or two of your own, what’s two more? Playdates keep the kids entertained, and you get work time without putting anyone out or paying for a sitter! Swapping is also a good alternative for when you’re contemplating getting rid of your kids all-together. (JOKING…mostly)

7. #theresanappforthat 

Utilize resources. I know, everybody says that, but actually do it. I once had a gal from the writing center sit on the phone with me for over an hour while I re-wrote a paper. Need a resume? Well, Chris in the career center can tell you that yours is missing an objective, has too many bullet points, and your name is spelled wrong. Not only do these resources offer priceless feedback, but having a scheduled appointment provides accountability and is one more step in getting those items crossed off the aforementioned to-do lists.

8. #strikewhiletheironshot  

You won’t like this one, sorry. Usually the last thing I want to do after five hours in class is open that computer back up, but when the information is fresh, the work is easier and faster. And what a great feeling to have something done long before it’s due.

9. #dropitlikeitshot 

You will like this one, you’re welcome. When I’ve been wrestling over a single paragraph for the better part of an hour accomplishing virtually nothing, I give myself permission to close my computer and walk away. Even though it still needs to get done, I can make better use of my time and re-visit when I’ve given myself a brain break.